Liverpool Art Prize 2012 – Winners

Robyn Woolston

The winner of the Liverpool Art Prize 2012 is Robyn Woolston
Tomo wins the People’s Choice Award

Robyn will be awarded £2000 and a solo display at Liverpool’s Walker Art Gallery in 2013.

Liverpool-based Robyn Woolston, a filmmaker, photographer and installation artist who originally hails from the Midlands, is passionate about people, relationships and the way the world works, which is reflected in her work that also raises questions concerning social, economic and ecological perspectives.

Robyn began her career as an artist and film-maker before becoming more involved in installation work. Acutely aware of the world around her, Robyn once travelled to the Sinai Desert to embark on a three-day solo fasting experience with only a sleeping bag and 16 bottles of water for company, and it is this intuitive connection with the world and its inhabitants that Robyn uses to fuel her work.

Robyn’s work at the Liverpool Art Prize exhibition is, by her own admission, her most ambitious yet: “It’s my most ambitious work in terms of the opportunities and constraints presented by the space. I’ve been working with the Accumulator Tower at Metal so I’m dealing with shifting, and at times ephemeral, light. Plus the height of approximately eleven metres offered up some exciting engineering conundrums.”

On receiving the prestigious award Robyn said: “I am utterly overjoyed and overwhelmed. It hasn’t sunk in yet but winning the prize will hopefully open up new opportunities for me, giving me the chance to work in other interesting spaces with lots of different materials. I think it will enable me to widen my area of work.”

This year’s winner was drawn from shortlisted artists: Wallasey based audio and installation Alan Dunn, graffiti artist and painterTomo, and Jon Barraclough and Mike Carney from The Drawing Paper (a not-for-profit, independently published, newspaper-based gallery focussed on contemporary drawing practice) and of course Robyn herself.

Visitors to Metal at Edge Hill Station have also voted on their favourite works. The £1000 People’s Choice Award was awarded toTomo.

Tomo said: “Just to be part of the exhibition is the real prize. Most artists on the short list are a lot more established than me so it’s a real honour.”

Tomo
Tomo

Jenny Porter, Curator at Metal said: “This year’s Liverpool Art Prize is a great example of the exciting and dynamic art practices that are emerging from Liverpool at the moment. All the artists have made fantastic work and the exhibition has been really popular.”

Two new residency awards open to regional and national artists were also presented – the Metal Studio Award was presented to Anna Mulhearn with a prize including supported studio space for a period of one year at Edge Hill Station, and the Metal International Residency was awarded to Claire Weetman whose prize includes a month long residency in Shanghai in partnership with Shanghai Art School.

Prior to the ceremony, the panel of expert judges including Mike Stubbs, CEO and Director of FACT, Laura Davis, Arts Editor of the Liverpool Daily Post, Sook-Kyung Lee, Curator at Tate Liverpool, last year’s winner artist Markus Soukup, and Paul Hyland a representative from Duncan Sheard Glass, one of the exhibition’s sponsors, with Ian Jackson of ArtinLiverpool.com as (non-voting) chair met at Metal to assess the exhibited works together and made their final decision on who was to win this year’s prize. The artists have all created their pieces on site and some work specifically responds to and resonates with the unusual architecture of the gallery.

Robert Robson, Artistic Director at the Lowry presented the award. He said: “Metal is a remarkable space and Liverpool Art Prize is a fantastic celebration of the contemporary art scene in Liverpool.”

An after-party was held at LEAF on Bold Street, attended by the artists, judges and those involved in running this increasingly influential art prize.

Artinliverpool.com founded the Liverpool Art Prize in early 2008, it was one of the first major visual art events in the Capital of Culture year. The Art Prize is now a firmly established part of Liverpool’s annual arts diary, acknowledging the outstanding achievements of local artists and their contribution to contemporary art. It aims to promote national awareness and discussion of contemporary art in the city and to support individual artists in developing their practice.

This year the exhibition is accompanied by a huge amount of complementary activity curated and produced by ten artists’ studios and groups from across Liverpool who have partnered with the Prize to present Liverpool Art Month – a showcase of the city’s artists. See http://liverpoolartprize.com/?page_id=641 for more details.

Nominations for next year’s Liverpool Art Prize open on 17 September – see www.liverpoolartprize.com for more details

Images – Copyright McCoy Wynne

THE LIVERPOOL ART PRIZE 2012
Continues until Saturday 9 June 2012
Metal at Edge Hill Station, Tunnel Road, Liverpool, L7 6ND
Open – Tue – Fri 2pm – 6pm, Sat 12pm – 4pm
Closed Sunday and Monday
Viewings can also be made by appointment. Call [0151] 707 2277
Free Entry

robyn-woolston-last-c-mccoy-wynne
Robyn Woolston and her work - 'Last'
Tomos Mum and Grandmother
Tomo's Mum and Grandmother show their delight

LIVERPOOL ART PRIZE 2012

lap2012 image

LIVERPOOL ART PRIZE 2012

The exhibition runs from 27 April – 9 June.
Private View – Thursday 26 April 18-21.00
Open Tuesday – Friday 2 – 6pm and Saturday 12 – 4pm, or by appointment, (closed on Sunday and Monday).

The Liverpool Art Prize 2012 is an exhibition of four shortlisted artists awarded for their outstanding achievements and contribution to contemporary art within Liverpool, and further afield.

Shortlisted artists exhibiting:  Alan Dunn, Tomo, Robyn Woolston and The Drawing Paper’s Jon Barraclough and Mike Carney. (Full artists details here)

This year the exhibition is accompanied by a huge amount of complementary activity curated and produced by ten artist’s studios and groups from across Liverpool who have partnered with the Prize to present Liverpool Art Month – a showcase of the city’s artists. Click HERE for full listings.

Also, look on www.metalculture.com/liverpool/liverpool-art-prize-2012.html for details on two new residency awards open to regional and nationally based artists.

Metal at Edge Hill Station, Platform one, Tunnel Road, Liverpool L7 6ND.
Free Admission.
For more information or to book a group/school tour of the exhibition please click on the poster above or contact edgehill@metalculture.com or 0151 7072277.

New ART MONTH For Liverpool

LAM logo 300Visual Art is set to dominate the city this May as ‘The Liverpool Art Month’ is officially launched.

The Liverpool Art Month is a new initiative aimed at showcasing the city’s artists during the Liverpool Art Prize exhibition. 

Metal, the organisers behind the Liverpool Art Prize, has formed a new partnership with Liverpool John Moores University’s School of Art and Design and some of the city’s leading independent arts organisations, studio groups and artist’s networks including:  Arena studios and gallery, the Bluecoat’s studio artists, the Bridewell studios, dot-art, Redwire artst’s studios, The Royal Standard, The Gallery Liverpool, Wolstenholme Creative Space, and POST female artists network.

Liverpool Art Month will bring the city’s artists together in a new series of events and exhibitions that will be spread across a number of exciting and undiscovered locations.  The network of artists and gallery spaces is hoping to attract the region’s art lovers to Liverpool city centre to see the Liverpool Art Prize exhibition alongside the creative emerging talent found in the city’s exciting making spaces.

As part of Liverpool Art Month, the inaugural Liverpool Art Show will be unveiled at Camp and Furnace on Thursday 3rd May. Taking place until Sunday 6th May, the Liverpool Art Show is presented by Merseyside art consultants, dot-art and Matt Ford. Combining live performance and music with fine art exhibition, The Art Show will feature four breakthrough artists from Liverpool shortlisted for their experimental perceptions of the local cityscape. Sponsored by venue Camp and Furnace, there will be live performances from The Sense of Sound Singers and DJ sets from CANT MIX WONT MIX SHDNT MIX DON’T MIX.

On Friday 4th May Arena studios and galleries will present their 10th annual art auction with artwork available to bid on including work by each of the five shortlisted Liverpool Art Prize artists.  This is an opportunity to buy contemporary artwork by some of Liverpool’s rising stars, viewings of the work from 6pm auction starts at 7pm.

A series of exhibitions and installations will be presented on Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout May by Red Wire Artists Studios and arts organisation Wolstenholme Creative Space. This includes the exhibition, DIRT, from 9th-12th May that presents video, drawing, sculpture and sounds around the perception of dirt by four artists. Spectrum, at Wolstenholme Creative Space from 10th-27th May, features 15 solo exhibitions with five Liverpool-based artists, duos and collectives exhibiting each week.

On 25 May – 1 June there will also be the opportunity to see the LJMU School of Art and Design final degree show at the Art and Design Academy (ADA), on Duckinfield Street (next to the Catholic Cathedral). The School’s degree show is always a key event in the city’s cultural calendar. This year’s event runs over the weekend so there’s no reason not to pop in to the ADA for a look around and a chat with the students and staff.

The final weekend in May will feature the inaugural Liverpool Art Fair (www.liverpoolartfair.com), oganised by dot-art, an exciting new open submission selling event over five days, designed to connect local artists with new art buyers on a large scale, break down barriers, and make affordable art accessible to all. It will take place across two large exhibition spaces in the newly rejuvenated Camp and Furnace (previously the A-Foundation) in Liverpool’s Baltic Triangle; launching on the evening of Thursday 31st May, and open to the public from 11am-6pm from Friday 1st – Monday 4th June.

Also look out for the many events happening across Liverpool’s Light Night on Friday 18th May.

The Liverpool Art Month is currently accepting donations from individuals and organisations who want to see the event get even bigger and better, both this year and for the future. To achieve this, they have created a ‘Crowdfunding’ site, where donations can be made easily. In return, there are numerous tokens on offer including the opportunity for a Liverpool Art Prize Nominee to lead a workshop at your workplace or venue.

There is also a video on the site explaining a little more about the art month.   http://www.sponsume.com/project/liverpool-art-month.

This announcement is in addition to Metal’s two fantastic new award prizes that will be up for grabs as part of this year’s Liverpool Art Month. The prizes join the fifth annual Liverpool Art Prize and are announced as a year-long studio residency at Metal and a month-long international residency in Shanghai, China.

The two new Residency prizes exist alongside the main Art Prize with a separate nominations and judging process, which is now open. For the first time, artists based outside of the Merseyside area are eligible to apply.  Full details of who can apply and downloadable application forms can be found at http://www.metalculture.com/liverpool/liverpool-art-prize-2012.html.

Liverpool Art Month Supported by..
metal logo

Two New Prizes Announced for the Liverpool Art Prize

LAP logoInternational and UK based Residencies Up For Grabs

Metal, organisers of The Liverpool Art Prize 2012 has announced two fantastic new prizes that will be up for grabs as part of this year’s prize. A year-long studio residency at Metal and a month long international residency in Shanghai, China.

Now in its fifth year, The Liverpool Art Prize is a competition of contemporary art open to all professional artists based or born in the Liverpool City Region or in the surrounding boroughs of Liverpool, Wirral, St Helens, Knowsley, Halton and Sefton.  The Liverpool Art Prize 2012 exhibition will take place at Metal, Edge Hill Station, from Fri 27 April – Sat 9 June featuring the work of nominated artists Alan Dunn, Robyn Woolston, Tomo (James Thompson) and The Drawing Paper (Jon Barraclough & Mike Carney).

The two new Residency prizes exist alongside the main Art Prize with a separate nominations and judging process, which is now open. For the first time, artists based outside of the Merseyside area are eligible to apply.  Full details of who can apply and downloadable application forms can be found at http://www.metalculture.com/liverpool/liverpool-art-prize-2012.html.

To the winner of the Metal Studio Residency Award, Metal is offering a year-long studio residency at Edge Hill Station in Liverpool.  This recently renovated, Grade II listed, historic building is Metal’s Liverpool base and includes space for exhibition, events, meetings, cooking and administration.

The winner will receive rent-free studio space, including utilities and services, mentoring opportunities with Metal staff and associated artists, a £500 materials budget, the loan of A/V equipment, exposure on Metal’s website, e-newsletter, and through the Liverpool Art Prize, a year’s worth of marketing and support for project funding and the development of ideas.

Through a partnership with Shanghai Art School and LJMU’s School of Art and Design, Metal is also offering a month long international residency opportunity for visual artists living and working in the North West region to travel to Shanghai, China.  Shanghai Art School will host the visit and provide accommodation and access to a studio for one month.  The award is envisioned as a professional and ideas development opportunity for artists and is part of the city twinning activity between Liverpool and Shanghai.

The Award includes: Economy travel to Shanghai, accommodation and access to studio facilities for one month, up to 20 working days Per Diem and a £500 travel budget whilst in China, in addition to exposure on Metal’s website, e-newsletter, and through Liverpool Art Prize marketing.

Jenny Porter, Project Manager at Metal and Liverpool Art Prize Curator said:”We’re delighted to be offering the two, new, exciting residency Art Prizes as part of the fifth Liverpool Art Prize. It’s a significant part of an exciting expansion plan for The Art Prize, which will be announced shortly. I’m really looking forward to seeing the applications and to seeing the work of those from outside the Merseyside Region being included for the first time. In the five years that it’s been running, the Art Prize has gone from strength to strength. That we’re able to put such exciting plans in place for this year is a great testimony to how The Liverpool Art Prize is being viewed by the arts community.”

Professor Juan Cruz, Director of the Liverpool School of Art and Design said: “the Liverpool Art Prize is all about developing new possibilities for the artists in the city region and I encourage anyone who has ambition to broaden their horizons to apply for this year’s prize. The Liverpool School of Art and Design has a long history of supporting the city’s cultural development and we are pleased to be in partnership with Metal on such an important initiative.”

‘Elements & Satellites’ Markus Soukup at the Walker

‘Elements & Satellites’ Markus Soukup at the Walker
24 March – 15 July

Elements & Satellites, a display of recent work by 2011 Liverpool Art Prize winner Markus Soukup, opens at the Walker Art Gallery from 24 March to 15 July 2012 and includes a new piece made especially for the gallery.

Zwischen-Verbindung, an animation project which uses a variety of techniques and incorporates a sculpture set in a virtual space, is a response to the Walker Art Gallery’s collection of Italian Renaissance paintings.

The animation acts as a bridge, linking the technology of the past with that of the present; exploring the way advances made during the Renaissance period have made our life in the 21st Century what it is today.

The title of the piece, taken from the German zwischen (between) and Verbindung (connection) refers to the idea of ‘interconnectivity’, a notion that all things are related and cannot be understood in isolation.

The display includes two other interesting pieces. Un Space (2011) is a video project inspired by a walk on the tidal mud flats of Southend. The work focuses on this ‘in between’ place and its constant state of change.

The narrative of the main video describes the effects of the tide filmed during observations on the Thames Estuary, while a second monitor shows an animation on the relationship between tidal and lunar movement.The final piece is a sequence of experimental light drawings that are a playful look at motion and perception.

As the winner of the Liverpool Art Prize 2011, the opportunity to display work in the Walker Art Gallery was awarded to Markus as part of his first prize.

Dr Laura MacCulloch, curator of British Art says: “We are delighted to be showing the work of Markus Soukup, winner of the Liverpool Art Prize. We often seek ways to reinterpret our collection and Markus’ new piece does just that, shedding new light on older paintings. Markus’ work reflects his interest in language, space and the imagination and investigates the tension between our thirst for new technology and its impact on society.”

Markus says: “It is amazing to be exhibiting at the Walker Art Gallery. My interest in various phenomena has inspired three different pieces. I hope the selection will act as a bridge between times and passes on some of that fascination.”

Link to The Walker Art Gallery

Sponsor the Liverpool Art Month

You can Sponsor the Liverpool Art Month

The Liverpool Art Prize is a competition of contemporary art, which was inspired by the Turner Prize and began in 2008. It is open to all professional artists based or born in the Liverpool City Region or in the surrounding boroughs of Liverpool, Wirral, St Helens, Knowsley, Halton and Sefton. Now in its fifth year, The Liverpool Art Prize exhibition takes place at Metal Liverpool.

This year, some of Liverpool’s studio groups and galleries have come together to develop Liverpool Art Month. This will take the form of an exciting programme of events, exhibitions and workshops for Liverpool during the month of May 2012. This is the perfect chance to discover several local artists and their working environment throughout a series of interconnected happenings and performances. Visitors can also buy some artworks at affordable prices.

By backing our project, not only do you receive a huge thank you and certain special edition memorabilia of the project, but you also get the satisfaction of knowing that you have helped to support what promises to be a wide programme of events to showcase the talent of artists based in Liverpool for all to enjoy.

Participating organisations include:

Arena Studios & Gallery
The Bluecoat
Breeze
The Bridewell
Dot-Art
The Gallery
Liverpool John Moores University
Metal
POST
Red Wire
The Royal Standard
Walker Art Gallery
Wolstenholme Creative Space

Some events will also be taking place as part of Open Culture’s Lightnight

Check out listings for all events here.

 Link to Sponsume Page

In return for your Sponsorship you get…

Thank You

£5 or more : A Special Thank You on The Liverpool Art Prize website

Badge

£10 or more : A Liverpool Art Month badge and thank you on The Liverpool Art Prize website.

Signed Brochure

£25 or more : A Liverpool Art Prize brochure signed by artists and all of the above

Screenprint

£50 or more : A LIMITED EDITION screenprint of Liverpool Art Prize 2012 shortlisted Artist’s drawings

Donated artwork

£100 or more : An artwork donated by an artist based in one of the studio groups/galleries

AGA dinner with Liverpool Art Prize shortlisted artists

£250 or more : Join The Liverpool Art Prize shortlisted artists for an informal AGA dinner and discussion

Artist Talk

£300 or more : One of the artists shortlisted for The Liverpool Art Prize will come and deliver a talk at your business/institution

 Link to Sponsume Page

2012 Liverpool Art Prize – The Shortlist

SHORTLIST ANNOUNCED FOR LIVERPOOL ART PRIZE 2012

Local artists Alan Dunn, Tomo, Robyn Woolston and The Drawing Paper’s Jon Barraclough and Mike Carney have been revealed as the shortlist for the 2012 Liverpool Art Prize, when it returns for its 5th successive year in 2012.

All four will exhibit their work at Metal, based at Edge Hill Station, Liverpool, from Fri 27 April – Sat 9 June in the hope of winning the prestigious prize, which was established in Liverpool’s Capital of Culture year 2008.

SHORTLIST ANNOUNCED FOR LIVERPOOL ART PRIZE 2012

Local artists Alan Dunn, Tomo, Robyn Woolston and The Drawing Paper’s Jon Barraclough and Mike Carney have been revealed as the shortlist for the 2012 Liverpool Art Prize, when it returns for its 5th successive year in 2012.

All four will exhibit their work at Metal, based at Edge Hill Station, Liverpool, from Fri 27 April – Sat 9 June in the hope of winning the prestigious prize, which was established in Liverpool’s Capital of Culture year 2008.

The shortlist was whittled down from the 48 entries received by the organisers following an open call for nominations.  The highly qualified panel of judges, which this year comprises of; Mike Stubbs, CEO and Director of FACT, Laura Davis, Arts Editor of the Liverpool Daily Post, Sook-Kyung Lee, Curator at Tate Liverpool, and last year’s winner artist Markus Soukup, with Ian Jackson of ArtinLiverpool.com  as (non-voting) chair.  The shortlisted artists will need to continue to impress the panel with the work they exhibit in order to win. The winner will be revealed at an awards ceremony on Wednesday 30 May at which the People’s Choice Award winner will also be revealed.   Further details on what the winners will receive will be released in the New Year.

The shortlist is;

Wallasey-based artist Alan Dunn (http://www.alandunn67.co.uk/)


Alan compiles CDs of artists’ audio works on themes such as the Mersey Tunnels, revolution or numbers, with contributors including Pete Wylie, Yoko Ono, Andy Warhol, David Bowie and Carol Kaye.

Graffiti artist & painter Tomo (http://quangowangism.com/index.htm)


Tomo’s
work can be seen as a kind of storytelling through the materials he uses. The work is informed by a strong DIY ethic and he strives to make the best he can with whatever is available, often working with discarded items.

Robyn Woolston (http://www.robynwoolston.com/)


Robyn Woolston’s
practice involves installation, photography, moving image, print and on-line projects.  She is passionate about people, relationships and the way the world works.  This is reflected in her work, which raises questions concerning social, economic and ecological perspectives.

The Drawing Paper (Jon Barraclough and Mike Carney) (http://drawing-paper.tumblr.com/)


Members of the Royal Standard studio, Jon Barraclough and Mike Carney curate, design and publish The Drawing Paper, a not-for-profit, independently published, newspaper-based gallery focussed on contemporary drawing practice. It is distributed freely around selected galleries and establishments in Liverpool, the UK and beyond.  They have published four issues since 2010 and continue to provide a platform for local, Liverpool based artists, exposing their work to a much wider audience, as well as linking other artists up with one another.

The Liverpool Art Prize is a competition of contemporary art, which was inspired by the Turner Prize and began in 2008. It is open to all professional artists based or born in the Liverpool City Region which includes the boroughs of Liverpool, Wirral, St Helens,  Knowsley, Halton and Sefton.

The Art Prize is organised by Metal at Edge Hill Station where the exhibition of short-listed artists is held. The Prize is co-organised and was conceived by Ian & Minako Jackson, the founders of artinliverpool.com which is now managed by VAiL (Visual Arts In Liverpool)

Previous Liverpool Art Prize winners are Imogen Stidworthy, AL and AL, David Jacques and Marcus Soukup, who is currently exhibiting at the Walker Art Gallery (24 March – 15 July 2012) as part of his prize, in addition to judging the 5th Liverpool Art Prize. The previous People’s Choice winners are James Quin, Brendan Lyons, The Singh Twins and Elizabeth Willow, who have also gone on to achieve great respect within the industry.  2011 People’s Choice winner James Quin has just finished exhibiting at Metal as part of the Edge Hill Archive project

Ian and Minako Jackson of ArtinLiverpool.com, who conceived of the art prize said “We are thrilled with this exciting shortlist of artists for the fifth Liverpool Art Prize. The panel of judges have gone through a tough selection process to pick 4 artists, consisting of a mix of emerging and established artists.  As in previous years there is an eclectic combination of practices which should make for another fascinating exhibition. We are really looking forward to the exhibition opening in April 2012 at Metal at Edge Hill Station.”

Jenny Porter, Project Manager at Metal and curator of the Liverpool Art Prize exhibition said; “The judges have done an excellent job this year of choosing four diverse and extremely talented artists as finalists for this, the fifth, Liverpool Art Prize.  We’re really excited to be involved again and are working hard to make this year’s prize the centre of a variety of creative activity from Liverpool based artists.  I can’t wait to start working with the artists to see what ideas they’ll have for the buildings at Edge Hill Station.”

See also http://www.metalculture.com and http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/

 

The Drawing Paper

The Darwing Paper, Mike Carney and Jon Barraclough. Photo c. McCoy Wynne

The Drawing Paper (Jon Barraclough and Mike Carney) (http://drawing-paper.tumblr.com/)

Members of the Royal Standard studio, Jon Barraclough and Mike Carney curate, design and publish The Drawing Paper, a not-for-profit, independently published, newspaper-based gallery focussed on contemporary drawing practice. It is distributed freely around selected galleries and establishments in Liverpool, the UK and beyond.  They have published four issues since 2010 and continue to provide a platform for local, Liverpool based artists, exposing their work to a much wider audience, as well as linking other artists up with one another.

Q & A – The Drawing Paper (Mike Carney)

Q: Tell us a little about yourself

I’m just a down to earth Liverpool lad with creative leanings. I don’t have a traditional fine art background – I’m a practising graphic designer by trade with almost 20 years experience. Alongside this I’ve been developing my interest in drawing, I publish Drawing Paper with Jon Barraclough and make music. I’m reasonably good at football and competent in the kitchen

Q: Can you tell us a little more about the ethos or thinking behind your work?

Drawing Paper is an independent newspaper based gallery of sorts and platform for drawing in all its forms. We showcase work from emerging, established, local and international artists. It’s a not for profit project and logo free zone, funded and made possible by fees collected from its contributing artists (which pays for printing and some distribution).

My drawings are somewhat minimal, intricate and restrained abstract explorations. Working with fine line ink pens, pencils and dry transfer shapes and textures, I have devised a visual vocabulary of controlled geometric elements alongside loose, expressive gestures. I enjoy the compositional challenge trying to marry these differing elements together. I like the contrast between the controlled, precise details and the expressive marks. This interest stems from my work as a designer where I’m frequently working with software which allows for absolute control and precision. When I’m drawing there’s no undo button so I have to embrace the mistakes and accidents. Sometimes I have a visual starting point in my head, other times I allow drawings to evolve more intuitively. Possibly in an unconscious attempt to emulate the computer screen I tend work on bright smooth or glossy paper.

Q: How/when did you start making art?

Having not really drawn much since my school days and foundation course almost 20 years ago, my interest was sparked again by Drawing Paper partner Jon Barraclough about 10 years ago after a particularly fine homEmade Thai curry at his house one winters eve. I began developing my practice more seriously when I joined The Royal Standard in 2007.

Q: What brought you to Liverpool?

I was born in Warrington but my parents moved back to Liverpool when I was 2 years old and I’ve been here ever since apart from a couple of years studying Graphic Design up the road in Blackpool during the early 90s.

Q: Where do you get inspiration from?

My creative friends, music, books, collections of things, curious objects, overheard conversations, trawling the internet, the countryside… inspiration can come from almost anything.

Q: What do you find inspirational about Liverpool?

Cliched, but there’s always something interesting going on.

Q: What would your dream project be?

Designing my own book showcasing my drawings and having a generous budget to work with.

Q: Do you think there is enough support for emerging artists?

Perhaps the local art establishments could pay a little more attention to talented locals by making purchases and offering opportunities to exhibit in addition to their outward looking programmes and agendas.

Q:  What do you like/what would you change about the Liverpool art scene?

There needs to be more contemporary and critically engaging independent spaces and pop up projects and we need to retain our creative people. Liverpool is traditionally a transient city with people coming and going all the time but I would like to see more people staying and establishing things as they develop more skills and gain confidence.

Q: What other exhibitions/shows/events are you looking forward to in 2012?

The Biennial, Cy Twombly at Tate Liverpool and The John Moores Painting Prize at The Walker. All the shows at The Royal Standard of course.

Q: Where do you see yourself in 5 years time?

On my laptop.

Q: Do you have any hidden talents? 

I know this chap called Bantam Lions who makes electronic music. You should check him out.

Q & A – The Drawing Paper (Jon Barraclough)

Q. Tell us a little about yourself

I’m a 54 year old emerging artist, father of three great sons who are growing up, at last, and giving me (some) time to do my thing. I’ve been an engineer, worked in a shop and, after art school, made a living either as a teacher or a graphic designer. Around fifty I began to think I had something to say as an artist.

Q. Can you tell us a little more about the ethos or thinking behind your work?

Drawing Paper was mostly Mike’s idea – but I was very happy to join him and to get behind it. We both love the printed object and we both love drawing . Our appreciation of the power and magic of drawing, in the broadest sense, and our experience of being visual communicators gives us a shared sense of excitement about drawing – and we are moved by very similar kinds of work. Drawing Paper is therefore a coming together of our shared obsession and it retains an independent, lo-fi  feel that people like. If someone else was doing Drawing Paper I’d collect it and want to be in it.

Q. How/when did you start making art?

When my dad taught me how to draw from imagination. I would watch him with fascination as he created something out of nothing on a scrap of paper. I’d be about 5 or 6. Then I had a painting of a cityscape chosen to be in the Bradford School’s Junior Art exhibition in 1966, at the Cartwright Memorial Hall. I’d seen work there by Henry Moore and Hockney and figured I was on the way to fame and fortune.

Q. What brought you to Liverpool

I’m an estranged Yorkshireman.  I came to Liverpool from London, where I had my first studio, because I wanted more time and space and because I was offered some teaching at the Poly. It was a definite choice to come to Liverpool though. I knew I had to get back up North, to reality.

Q. Where do you get inspiration from?

Everything and nothing. Or maybe the connectedness of all things and the traces we leave behind us.

Q. What do you find inspirational about Liverpool?

It’s pride, it’s scale and it’s faded grandeur. There’s a romantic and edgy feel about it too.

Q. What would your dream project be?

To open a drawing centre in Liverpool. To write a sensible, useful, and helpful book about drawing.

Q. Do you think there is enough support for emerging artists?

No

Q. What do you like/what would you change about the Liverpool art scene?

A greater sense of collective passion, ownership and sharing between institutions and artists – and the audiences they reach.

Q. What can we expect from the work you’ll show at the Liverpool Art Prize exhibition?

Drawing and hospitality.

Q. What other exhibitions/shows/events are you looking forward to in 2012?

The Liverpool Biennial, Cy Twombly and David Hockney at the RA. Oh and the show I’ll being putting on at the Victoria Gallery and Museum in June with artists from New York and Louisiana.

Q. Where do you see yourself in 5 years time?

Drawing Paper number 15? Happy in my work?

Q. Do you have any hidden talents?

Yes.

Robyn Woolston

Robyn Woolston Photo c. McCoy Wynne

Robyn Woolston (http://www.robynwoolston.com/)

Robyn Woolston’s practice involves installation, photography, moving image, print and on-line projects.  She is passionate about people, relationships and the way the world works.  This is reflected in her work, which raises questions concerning social, economic and ecological perspectives.

Q & A – Robyn Woolston

Q: Tell us a little about yourself

-I am an artist and filmmaker. I began my career working in broadcast television but soon sought a platform that offered me greater freedom and ‘space’ to create. After being commissioned to Produce and Direct a short documentary for ITV called ‘Émigré’ I decided to study Fine Art full-time.

These days I install large-scale sculptural interventions created out of ‘waste’. As well as working with lens-based media in terms of Artists Film and Video / Photography. I also work with everyone from primary school children through to prisoners, as well as vulnerable and hard to reach adults, across a myriad of Art in Education settings.

Q: Can you tell us a little more about the ethos or thinking behind your work?

-I play with the symbols and products that a culture uses to create its meanings. My sculptural interventions comment on the co-dependent relationship between consumption and power, identity and autonomy, and the documentation and harvesting of processes within the socio-psycho geography of our collective experience.

-For example, we are fundamentally disconnected from the ‘waste’ that is generated by the commercialised systems that service, and profit from, our basic needs. I’m talking specifically here about the large-scale waste that is, in turn, creating large scale impacts upon the planet and our quality of life. Many corporate processes are fundamentally, and structurally, orientated to benefit their shareholders rather than the larger community. Thereby putting profit before people.

Q:  How/when did you start making art?

– My earliest memories involve being immersed in ‘making’ whether that was drawing, painting, pasting or sticking; as well as long summer nights exploring the world on my bike until the sun-set. So, really, I don’t remember a day when art and nature weren’t a fundamental part of the way in which I ‘process’ life. They are both a window and a mirror.

Q: What brought you to Liverpool?

-I took my Fine Art degree with Wirral Met College through John Moores University and stayed for the Capital of Culture in 2008. The possibilities really started opening up in terms of the city and its creative networks and in many ways it’s continued to flourish despite the fact we’ve lost some key players.

Q: Where do you get inspiration from?

– Systems, processes, patterns, cultural idiosyncrasies and perpetuated memes. Plus ‘waste’ products from the socio-political to the literal.

Q: What do you find inspirational about Liverpool?

– I love port cities; they have an ability to mirror the tide in terms of the delivery of ideas, people and fresh air to the shore. Each day new truths alight upon the city then flow back out to sea, having been realised, experienced and digested. It’s a pattern that repeats bringing life and energy to Liverpool’s people and places

Q:  What would your dream project be?

– I’d love to work with harvested plastic waste from the North Pacific Gyre. It’s the world’s largest eco-system yet the waste contained within it covers an area larger than Texas. It’s so far out to sea that it seems there’s a complete ‘disconnect’ in terms of personal responsibility on the part of the polluters.  The responsibility lies with both on-shore and off-shore processes and for me the waste is representative of non-circular thinking. Within holistic paradigms every part of the process is a part of the people that create, make, use and utilise its reason-for-being, it’s circular. There is no disconnection as the waste is as important as the product or service that generates it.

Q: Do you think there is enough support for emerging artists?

-It can be incredibly hard to sustain yourself whether you’re emerging or mid-career as there are very few financial ‘guarantees’ along the way. But what is abundant are opportunities in terms of locations, material and peer-to-peer support.  Nationally there are some great bodies ‘defending’ and re-defining the boundaries of Contemporary Arts practice and I would encourage new artists to become members of both AN and Axis.

Q:  What do you like about the Liverpool art scene?

– I love the density and variation of work on show during the Biennial & at the same time I admire ‘emergent’ galleries such as Curve. They actively seek to promote professional practice at an emerging level, and by doing so are re-defining the power structures of the city in a ‘rhizomatic’ fashion. I also adore Liverpool’s architecture, with all the innate possibilities it offers, there’s space to create, intervene and exhibit in conjunction with people like Camp and Furnace at the former A Foundation. The fabric of the city calls for sculptural interventions that reference migration, trade and industry against an ever changing sky-line.

Q: What can we expect from the work you’ll show at the Liverpool Art Prize exhibition?

-It’s my most ambitious work in terms of the opportunities and constraints presented by the space. I’m working with the Accumulator Tower so I’m dealing with shifting, and at times ephemeral, light. Plus the height of approximately eleven metres is offering up some exciting engineering conundrums.

Q: What other exhibitions/shows/events are you looking forward to in 2012?

Damien Hirst / Tate Modern

Rachel Whiteread / Whitechapel Gallery

The Biennial / Liverpool

Documenta (13) / Kassel, Germany

Q: Where do you see yourself in 5 years time?

– Hopefully continuing to ‘broker’ relationships between materials, locations and people.

Q: Do you have any hidden talents?

– I once ran the London marathon and a few years later fasted for three days, on my own, in the middle of the Sinai desert with just 16 bottles of water and a sleeping bag….so probably, resilience.